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American Boxer and Trump Supporter Donning Wall Pattern Shorts Gets Brutally Beaten by Mexican Rival

Lately, America has become a hotbed of political statements in some of the most controversial, albeit intriguing ways. Just recently, New York Governor Richard Cuomo claimed that he was an illegal immigrant and dared some of the U.S officials to deport him.

A political battle

Astonishingly, some of these intriguing political statements have seeped into facets of American life that are frankly, unexpected. Yes, ladies and gentlemen, we’re talking about the third thing that America loves most after POTUS and the Troops. It’s being a sports fan. And not just any sport, we’re talking boxing. Venue; Indio California at the ESPN Golden boy event. Okay, so it wasn’t the traditional Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather kind of fight, but what transpired in one showdown really caught the media’s attention.

Rod Salka caused a lot of controversy after donning boxer shorts that showcased a brick wall. An attempt to support the building of the Mexican border wall

Salka draws attention

A confident Rod Salka graced the canvas, looking fit and pumped for a fight that would turn out to be one night in hell for him. In what seemed to be a clear political statement, he rocked shorts, bearing the red, white and blue. What patriotism! However, it’s what complemented the flag-like bearings that shocked, amused, and bemused the crowd at the same time. Together with the American colors, a brick pattern followed round; with a bold statement echoing, ‘America 1st.’

Mexican rival

Ironically, his opponent was Mexican boxer, Francisco Vargas. So, perhaps it was the political statement that fueled Vargas; because he was simply having none of it. With utmost intensity, he brought his A-game to the fight and decided to turn the boxing match into a major bloodbath. In turn, Rod Salka suffered miserably in the process.

Taught a lesson

In fact, Twitter was in an uproar after the fight. The topic of discussion? How Vargas wiped the canvas with Salka’s blood.  The fight came to an end in the sixth round. Truthfully, it looked more like a brutal assault on Salka rather than a serious one on one fight.

Brutal assault

One tweet even showcased the brutality of the event. During the final embers of the match, Salka could be seen stumbling around and getting knocked from left to right. One right hook, in particular, was powerful enough to send Salka dropping to the canvas.

Blow after blow left Salka battered and bruised. Eventually, his corner could not have enough of it, eventually throwing in the towel after Salka’s bloodied face could handle no more punches.

Salka was mercilessly brutalized by Mexican opponent Vargas before his corner threw in the towel to put an end to the beat down

A massive statement

For Donald Trump supporters, the spectacle proved a massive miss. In an instant, the ideology of a concrete border that held immigrants back from the land of prosperity came crashing down terribly. For the left, it was a day of triumph. That an immigrant could define all odds in a foreign land, rise up, and make a name for themselves, is a tremendous feat.

Just a couple of weeks back, Donald Trump had tweeted with a lot of zeal and zest that the construction of the Southern Border Wall had just begun. A project that he had passionately called for during the campaign period in 2016.

Border-wall completion

However, after the Tweet, a majority of Twitter followers noticed that the images that had been shared by Donald Trump were shockingly not on the new wall. Instead, they were photos of ongoing repairs that were part of the existing fence that has been taking place since 2009.

A few weeks back, Donald Trump was put on the spotlight for posting images of a supposed Border wall construction, which was not the case

In the end, Americans were not impressed. Which begs the question; were the photos a straight up lie by the president or did he simply make a big mistake? Only time will tell if a solid border will eventually surface.

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